Den Instincts

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Teaching Charlie to love his crate using treat rewards.

There are many reasons to use a crate to help raise your best friend. Todays modern dogs are descended from wild canids, wolves, a creature that lives in a den for the first year of their life. The den experience provides our dogs wild relatives with safety from the elements and other predators. It gives the young puppies a place to stay while the older wolves go hunt and forage for food. Today, we use a crate to replicate the den experience for our domesticated canines.

Replicating this ancient instinct for our dog provides a safe place for them to stay when we are away from home. Properly using a crate for your dog can help prevent problem behaviors from occurring.  If you ever have the need to fly your dog with you on a trip, then using a crate in their daily lives will keep them prepared, should they ever need to travel with you on a plane. The crate can also travel with your dog if they ever go to stay with a relative or a friend of the family.

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Daisy enjoys her crate time and thinks of this place as her den.

The crate can also be a tool for helping to relieve separation anxiety in our canine companions. When a dog looks at their crate as a safe warm place to be this provides them with a sense of security and safety. This alleviates anxiety in general and can be a tool to help our anxious companions.

For the crate experience to be a good one it is important that it be introduced positively. The crate is never to be used as a punishment and doing so can ruin your dogs crate training experience. Follow my simple steps and your dog will be positively crate trained in no time. The following steps can be condensed into a weekend for younger dogs who have never had a bad experience with crate training, but may take longer to re-socialize an insecure dog to their crate.

1) Make sure that the crate you choose is size appropriate for your dog. Older dogs who are house trained can have a larger crate, but if you are using your crate for house training it is important to follow the “bed size… not bedroom size” rule. I personally recommend the airline style plastic crates, I like the sense of security my dog gets from the enclosure, but the wire crates work just as good. Either style will work.

2) Take your time getting your best friend used to the crate. Toss a treat inside the crate and encourage your dog to enter inside. I like to use the request “In Your House” as I do this. Immediately praise reward and encourage your dog to come back out. Repeat this 5-7 times in a row every 20-30 minutes until your dog is going in and out comfortably then move on to step 3.

3) Now begin to close the door of the crate behind your dog after they enter and say “In Your House”. Still toss a treat inside and now give an additional treat through the crate door. Immediately let them out and give plenty of praise for a job well done. Repeat this 5-7 times in a row every 20-30 minutes until your dog is going in and taking the treat at the door easily then move on to step 4 .

4) Once your dog is excited about entering the crate and accepts the door being shut behind them happily, it is time to start this next step. The idea is to begin extending your dogs time in the crate. Have your dog wait inside the crate and give a rewards through the door in “Rapid Fire”. To do this give a reward every 3-5 seconds at first. Build up to doing this for 1-2 minutes and begin step five.

5) Begin changing the time in between treats to a variable timed reward. Sometimes treats come in a quick succession, others there is a 10- 40 second gap between treats. Build your dogs time in the crate from several minutes up to 45 minutes or more using this technique.

6) Start walking out of the room and eventually the house by leaving and quickly returning and rewarding your dog several times in a row. Build your dogs time in between rewards and stay gone for longer chunks of time.

7) As your pup gets more comfortable with the crate experience begin pushing the time in the crate to several hours and overnight. At this point, phase out the treats but I recommend giving your dog a stuffed Kong toy or other special treat before you leave home. Limit your dogs time spent in their crate to a reasonable amount (generally a max of 3-5 hours). If left for longer periods a fenced outdoor dog run or dog walking service should be used.

Follow these steps and you will have a dog that loves and enjoys their crate, providing them a sense of security for life.

Happy training!

David Kabler has been training dogs since he was a boy and has been in training professionally since 1995. You can find out more about his unique training style by liking his Kabler School For Dogs facebook and instagram pages. David is available for lessons in Asheville, NC and surrounding areas. Call today to schedule you and your dogs consultation. David will evaluate your dogs personality and training needs and, it’s absolutely free. (828) 337-5792

Canine Scent Work Seminar

Canine Scent Work Seminar

Join us in learning about Canine Scent Work with instructor Buddy Lawson!

Join Kabler School For Dogs and Master Trainer Buddy Lawson for an amazing weekend of K9 scent and nose work. Instructor Buddy Lawson has successfully trained hundreds of dogs for police K9, search and rescue, competition, and support dog work. Spend a weekend exploring the world of training scent detection K9’s for a wide variety of purposes. Beginners and experts alike are welcome- all will gain valuable insight from Buddy Lawson’s years of experience. Please go to scheduling to book you and your dogs spot in this 2 day training seminar at the Kabler School For Dogs training facility on January 18-19th, 2020.

Canine Good Citizen Test

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Kabler School For Dogs will be hosting a Canine Good Citizen test in January 2020!

The Canine Good Citizen (CGC) Test is a great way to show off all of your hard work with your canine companion. At Kabler School For Dogs we are excited to be testing for the AKC’s CGC test on January 25th, 2020! The test will be held from 3-5pm on Saturday afternoon at the Kabler School For Dogs training facility.

The test consists of 10 different categories.
1. Accept a friendly stranger.
2. Sit politely for petting. 
3. Appearance and grooming.
4. Walking on a loose lead.
5. Walking through a crowd.
6. Sit, down, and stay in place.
7. Come when called.
8. Reaction to another dog.
9. Reaction to a distraction.
10. Supervised separation.

If you think your dog has what it takes to pass this test please schedule your dogs CGC!
Those who come out and pass the test will be granted the title of Canine Good Citizen, and earn a ribbon and certificate. The cost of the test is $45 plus the AKC’s registration fee. Please go to scheduling to reserve your dogs spot!

Forging a Strong Relationship with Your Best Friend

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Baxter and Winston excited to go!

In todays busy world it is easy to get caught up in your life and forget to spend quality time with your canine best friend. There are many daily activities that will help to forge a better relationship with your canine companion. In this post we will explore several ways that you and your best friend can enhance your natural bond.

Walking, hiking, and running with your best friend are the most obvious ways that you can spend more quality time with your dog. A daily walk or run around the neighborhood can be spiced up with special trips to new and exciting places. There are so many beautiful destinations for you and your best friend here in Asheville. Be sure to check the rules of the places that you plan on visiting so that you are best prepared for your excursion. For dogs that are not off leash trained I like to use a 20-30 foot long leash to give a better sense of freedom. For trips into the back country, consider teaching your dog to carry a weight appropriate dog backpack and be sure to carry a canine first aid kit.

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Golden Retriever Tully having some fun retrieving on his long line.

If you have a highly active dog, agility and obstacle course training may be just the outlet that will allow your best friend to get all of that extra energy out. Agility training will teach your dog to focus on the course and to your commands. This allows your dog to use both their mind and body at the same time which can tire out even the most energetic canine. It is incredibly fun and exciting to train your dog to weave and climb through one of these amazing courses.

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Belgian Malinois Barry Kabler, PH1,CGC clears a 5 foot fence obstacle. A well trained canine companion adds so much to our experience.

Bike riding with your best buddy can also be a safe and fun activity for you and your dog. So that your dog does not accidentally pull you over it is essential to use a canine bike riding device like The Springer. The Springer has a large coiled spring that allows your dog to pull with out pulling over you and your bike. Be sure to spend most of your time with your dog trotting and not at a full run. Be careful in the heat of the Summer as asphalt can become very hot and can burn your dogs pads. Teach your dog to use The Springer by walking your bike at first and once you start riding you can build up your dogs endurance slowly over several weeks. We offer a bike riding workshop if you need help introducing your dog to bike riding as a new activity!

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German Shepherd Mijo learning to ride safely during a Kabler Bike Riding Workshop.

Swimming with your best friend will get both of you out of town and out to some beautiful spots here in Western North Carolina. Most dogs will naturally learn to swim on their own but if your dog shows hesitation you can teach them to swim. Start in shallow water and over several trips build up your dogs confidence to venture into deeper water. I like to cross small shallow streams and encourage my dog to cross with me. Avoid fast moving water and don’t progress too quickly. Elder dogs who already know how to swim can also be good teachers for your dog. You can support your dog with one arm under their belly and use the other arm above and across their front paws to make sure that they don’t bring them up out of the water when learning to swim. Be sure to keep each experience positive and fun until your dog is swimming like a champ.

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Belgian Malinois pup Storm learning to water retrieve. Most breeds, love to swim as long as they are introduced to water early and in the right way.

Obedience training will give you and your best friend the communication skills that will allow you both to have the freedom to go almost anywhere. Obedience training provides your dog with mental stimulation and teaches them to look towards you for leadership and guidance. Dogs who feel that they are part of a pack with a strong leader  suffer from less anxiety and are more confident out in the world. Teaching your best friend to respond to the five basic commands of Heel, Sit, Down, Stay and Come no matter where you are or what is going on around you will allow you and your best friend to safely conquer the world together.

Have fun out there and happy training!

Advanced Group Training

Advanced group training is a big part of finishing your dog’s on and off leash training programs here at Kabler School.

David Kabler has been training dogs since he was a boy and has been a Certified Master Trainer since 1995. David is available for lessons in Asheville, NC. Call today or click on Scheduling to book you and your dogs free consultation. David will evaluate your dogs personality and training needs. (828) 337-5792

Teaching the Come Command- New Ways of Learning

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Lobo expressing his natural drive during a motivational come request exercise.

When new clients call me to train their best friend, the COME request is usually a top priority on their training list. As dog owners, one of our biggest desires is that our dog will come when called every time. Our best friends live in a world of distractions that are constantly competing with us for our dogs attention. Many dogs feel frustrated that they cannot chase the squirrels, or the kitties, or the other dogs that they see on their daily walks. These ‘competing motivations’ are constantly vying for our dogs attention and when we call our dogs back to us it is easy for our canines to ignore our pleading for them to drop the fun and return to our side. In this post I would like to explore techniques that we can use to help our canine friends learn this most vital request.

Many dog owners will use the come request only when it is needed. Then when their dog returns to them it is back on the leash, or back in the house, or back in the crate. It is vital that the come request be used often and that most of the time your dog is allowed to return to that exciting scent or whatever fun it was that they were having before being called.

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Lilly practicing a motivational recall request– look at that guardian focus!

In other words call your dog to you frequently and then immediately encourage them to return to the activity they were doing before being called. You should only put your dog back on their leash and end their fun in one out of ten recalls.

ALWAYS give your dog plenty of praise and a treat reward for coming when called. This is the one command that I will always give a treat for. Plenty of praise should also be showered on your best friend for returning to your side. This will let them know that there is a reward in it for them when they heed your call.

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Practicing motivational recalls with puppies makes a lasting impact!

Dogs feel plenty of frustration in their daily lives… they want to chase that rabbit scent or follow that deer trail. Dogs often will learn to be outwardly focused on the world around them and will hone in on that rather than on us. Luckily, it is easy to create a strong desire in your dog to also want to run towards you. Follow this simple exercise to help build a strong foundation for a successful COME request.

1. Go to a safe place like a fenced in park or field and attach your best friend to a long line (a 30-35 foot long leash).

2. Have a friend or other household member hold your dog close to them.

3. Show your dog that you have a handful of treats by placing them on your furry friends nose.

4. Immediately run away a short distance and turn, and excitedly but loudly and clearly say your dogs name, and the COME request. “Daisy, COME!”

5. Have your friend drop the leash as your dog shows excitement and starts to pull towards you. Make sure that your helper does not get their feet inadvertently tangled in the leash, which can cause an accidental correction.

6. Your dog will run to you and as soon as they get to you shower them with treats and praise. Immediately pick up the leash so they can’t run off again. Repeat this 5 to 7 times in a row once or twice a day.

7. Build up from a short distance to bigger distances over several weeks. It is important not to get too far away too quickly.

Use this tip and you will successfully create a desire in your dog to want to be with you and at your side as much as they want to smell the roses!

David Kabler has been training dogs since he was a boy and has been a Certified Master Trainer since 1996. David is available for lessons in Asheville, NC and surrounding areas. Call today to schedule you and your dogs consultation. David will evaluate your dogs personality and training needs and, it’s absolutely free. (828) 337-5792

Tight Leash To A Loose Leash Mindset

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Loose leash walking practice with pocket Pittie Sadie.

Shifting from a tight leash to a loose leash is one of the hallmarks of a Kabler School For Dogs training course. Owning a professionally trained dog means that you can walk your dog with pleasure on a loose leash, easily passing other dogs, squirrels, cats, you name it! Our program teaches several kinds of walks from a casual ‘Round Me’ command to a very formal ‘With Me’ heel request. These different types of walks each have their place and you can use them interchangeably as the need arises.

Before Kabler training, most owners have a tight leash on their dog. This tight leash feels like you have more control of your best friend, but in truth, you have very little control if all your walks are on a tight lead. The leash is actually a communication tool. There are 3 primary ways of communication with your dog; Voice commands, hand signals, and leash requests. During a Kabler on leash course your dog will learn that when you pull on the leash you are actually sending them an obedience request.

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Loose leash walk with Labrador retrievers Harper and Jackson.

Dogs who are inappropriately reacting to other dogs or people by barking, lunging, or extreme pulling on the leash can be successfully trained to have neutral energy and walk on a loose leash! The Kabler approach to training solves tough issues by addressing the root causes and utilizing several angles and behavioral solutions. Once you change your mindset, and your dog reaches a high state of training, loose leash walking becomes a way of life for both you and your dog.

Click on Scheduling to book you and your dogs FREE Consultation with Master Trainer David Kabler, or call (828) 337-5792 for more information.

Dog Training Tradition

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Yellow Lab Harper taking a break from obedience practice.

Dog training is a tradition that is passed down from one trainer to another. It is still mostly an oral tradition that is shared from one generation of trainers to the next. I have been very lucky to have been taught by some truly excellent trainers. I studied under each of my teachers fervently learning their training approach as thoroughly as possible. I would obsess over every detail and nuance of their technique and approach to training. Learning these technical training details didn’t always come easy to me. I would spend lots of time frustrated, feeling very uncoordinated, and struggling with the timing of responding to the dog I was working with. There were many days where it felt like I was all thumbs! But eventually, after hours and hours of practice, I’d have breakthroughs in my skills and begin to flow with the challenging techniques. At these moments the connection between dog and handler intensifies to an almost tangible level. To this day there is nothing as satisfying as the bond experienced with the dogs that I train.

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Boxer mix Sydney happy after obedience practice during Residency training course.

My personal training technique evolves and shifts over time, even to this day! When I learned different training styles from my teachers I worked to emulate their technique and form. Over the years, each of their methods informed my training approach. My style became a blend with the best approaches rising to the top. Some methods are suited to almost every dog, while others only work with certain dogs. I call this knowledge my tool box. Over many years my tool box has grown quite large, with a wide variety of training skills filling it.

An old adage in dog training exists that the only thing 2 dog trainers can agree on is what the 3rd dog trainer is doing wrong. Sadly, this is still often true today. Many trainers turn on each other, attacking other trainers style, technique, methods, philosophy, and equipment choices. In my opinion this intensely critical atmosphere is harming the evolution of dog training. One of my great pleasures in life is watching another trainer work a dog using different approaches than what I would choose to use. I am always intrigued as to where they learned and what past experiences are informing their current method. I am forgiving to even the unskilled trainers that I observe, knowing that all trainers share a love for dogs, and that all trainers skills will grow over time.

Dog training through play.

Norwich Terrier Comet having a game of chase and tug after obedience practice.

All dog trainers are a part of a tradition that goes back thousands of years all the way to the first dogs. There is literally nothing new in the world of dog training that hasn’t been done before, in a previous age. Even the most cutting edge dog training techniques of the modern age have been used by previous generations of bygone eras. From ancient Pharaohs’ of Egypt’s hunting dogs, to Roman dogs of war, to farm dogs of Europe, to sled dogs of North America, to dogs of the Far East, and everywhere else imaginable, all trainers have one thing in common– we are part of a continuum of people that keep the ancient tradition of dog training alive and well throughout the ages.

Obedience creates a window of communication with your best friend.

Yorkie Gryff having fun practicing his first long down stay.

Click on Scheduling to book you and your dogs FREE Consultation with Master Trainer David Kabler.

 

Solving Canine Crisis Behaviors

Off Leash Skills

Practicing off leash heeling skills in the neighborhood. Guiding your dog from problem walker to polite companion is our specialty.

Sometimes life doesn’t go as planned and our clients wind up with a dog who is out of alignment with their family’s goals. “I want to walk down the sidewalk happily with my dog, but my dog lunges at every dog they see, and eventually we stopped going on walks.” We hear stories like this daily. Fortunately, our training courses provide effective solutions for your best friends issues.

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Neighborhood loose leash walking skills are a primary goal of our On Leash Obedience Course.

A dog who expresses leash reactive energy may be suffering from pack survival stress and is in desperate need of proper guidance from their human. A dog who is in a constant state of crisis is not a happy dog. Bringing your dog’s behavior around in a way that is easy and fun is one of our training specialties. Creating aligned energy between you and your dog is the goal of every Kabler training program.

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Using customized training techniques, all dogs are able to learn how to walk politely at their owners side while out on walks.

The Kabler School For Dogs training team is committed to helping dog owners solve behavioral issues. Every dog is different and it’s important to choose a trainer with a large toolbox of training skills. All training courses are customized to fit the goals we set for you and your dog during a free consultation. Our approach is intuitive and based on years of experience taking dogs from puppy to advanced off leash reliability.

Please call to discuss your dogs training needs and to schedule your dog’s FREE consultation.

(828) 337-5792

Rock Solid Training

Heeling with German Shepherd Gunnar

Out on a loose lead neighborhood walk with German Shepherd Gunnar.

Creating rock solid obedience that you can safely rely on is what we do best here at Kabler School For Dogs. Once your dog begins their On and Off Lead training courses there is a path that we take from novice to expertly trained dog. The journey to training a dog to rock solid reliability is about teamwork, fun practice sessions, and carefully following the Kabler School For Dogs training roadmap.

Rock solid training begins by building a bombproof foundation. Foundation work teaches your dog how to respond to obedience requests with motivated energy. In the beginning, we want your dog to understand that following through with obedience brings reward. Short and fun training routines are the name of the game when building your foundation. Ending your dogs practice sessions while your dog is at their peak will make your dog always excited to train. Another strategy during the foundation phase is to switch back and forth between training and play.

Off leash heeling becomes a reality.

Punkin and Ayla out on an off leash training walk. Off leash training successfully finishes your dog’s training.

If your dog has behavioral issues like leash reactivity or fearful anxiety we recommend that counter-conditioning be started alongside the foundation phase of training. By using these powerful techniques consistently you can make noticeable changes in your dogs behavior. Counter-conditioning adjusts your dogs energy allowing the coming training phases to take root faster and with more success. The goal of counter-conditioning is to soften behaviors so that the training program can progress with less stress.

The next step on you and your dog’s  journey to rock solid obedience is the guidance phase of training. There are many ways of communicating with your dog including voice requests, hand signals, and body language. During this phase we emphasize communication using the leash. It’s important that your dog understand that a pull on the leash actually means something. Just like a horseback rider communicates with his steed using the reigns we are going to send our dog obedience requests using the leash. Once your dog understands and responds successfully to leash guidance we are ready to continue our training journey to the reliability stage.

Maggie being rewarded.

German Shepherd Maggie being rewarded for a long down stay request during a park training session.

When your dog clearly understands how to respond to the different leash requests it is time to build their ability to reliably listen to your direction. Following through with commands on one request, longer sit and down stays, and consistent loose lead walking are some of the highlights of this training stage. It’s important to train in low to moderate level distraction environments as we strive to achieve the goals of the reliability phase. Once our dog is performing with accuracy it’s time to progress into the finishing phase.

During the finishing phase of training our goals are to make sure the training will work for us anywhere. Some trainers call this the distraction proofing phase. Now that your dog is demonstrating their new training skills with ease it is time to put the training to the test in increasingly higher distraction settings. As your dog learns to respond successfully in higher distraction settings you will notice a settling in your dog that actually deepens the canine/human bond. Seeing that your dog will enthusiastically respond to their training requests regardless of the environment or situation you will know you have achieved rock solid performance with your newly trained best friend.

Down Stay at the park

Ayla and Punkin practice their long down stay at the park during their Residency training course.

Please call (828) 337-5792 for more information about the unique approach to training at Kabler School For Dogs. Locations in Asheville and Tricities, TN.

2018 Dock Diving Season

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Australian Cattle Dog Banjo building his dock jumping confidence at Beginner Dock Diving Class

May 19th marked the opening of the Western Carolina Diving Dogs 2018 jumping season, and boy are we excited! Dock Diving is America’s fastest growing dog sport, and Western Carolina Diving Dogs is the area’s premier dock diving training and event center. This summer Kabler School for Dogs will be offering Beginner Dock Diving Group Classes on Saturdays, Individual Instructional Lessons, and Private Hourly Dock Rentals. IMG_4826

Elder Yellow Lab Moose having fun at a Private Dock Diving Lesson

We will also be hosting three Ultimate Air Dog Competitions the following weekends:
June 9-10, July 14-15, and August 4-5.

Come out and enjoy the competition, or if you are interested in registering you can find scheduling information at the Ultimate Air Dogs Website

Forging Your Canine Friendship

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Rescue Mix Punkin exhibiting strong guardian focus during her Residency Training Course

Training is about forging a relationship between you and your dog. At Kabler School for Dogs, we offer a comprehensive series of training courses that guide you and your dog through the stages of puppyhood all the way into adulthood. When you raise your dog the Kabler way, you and your best friend will benefit from David’s years of experience in raising puppies, yearlings, all the way through advanced on and off leash obedience training.

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Bernese Mountain pup Aria practicing her down under the leg during her Puppy Course

The Kabler School for Dogs puppy program includes proper puppy care, puppy obedience training, puppy socialization, as well as games and tricks. The goal of puppy training is to set the foundation for a stable, well-socialized young companion, all while avoiding problem behaviors before they become deeply rooted bad habits. The puppy course is designed to guide you and your dog from the ages of 10 weeks – 6 months.

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Great Pyrenees Bear graduated through Puppy and Yearling Training Courses

At Kabler School for Dogs, the Yearling training course is designed specifically for adolescent dogs. It is important to realize that adolescent dogs are not at full maturity and require a unique and interactive approach to training. The Yearling program is designed to guide you and your dog through this adolescent phase from 6-12 months. Goals for this course are to help you successfully navigate your dogs flight instinct period, introduce your adolescent dog to more advanced reward strategies in obedience, and to keep your dog engaged in fun activities. These activities can include safe swimming, biking, hiking, retrieving, and other fun games, that nourish the adolescent dog’s young mind.

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Belgian Malinois Jango and his guardian learn their way around the flirt pole

At one year of age, Kabler School for Dogs offers professional on and off leash obedience courses. Both the on and off leash programs will guide you and your dog through the highest levels of training, communication, and you will achieve reliable real world results. The on and off leash courses use an experiential approach that will take you from the training studio out into the neighborhood, local parks, and challenging group walk situations. As your dog progresses in these programs coursework becomes more dynamic and challenging. In addition, David is trained in many different techniques to tackle tough behavioral cases that may otherwise fall through the cracks.

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Australian Shepherd rescue Willow out free roaming on her long line during her Off Leash Training Course

The Kabler School for Dogs training program represents a true, all-life-stages approach to raising your family’s new canine best friend. Every training course takes on a life of its own, as the Kabler School for Dogs Team gets to know you and your dog. The Kabler School for Dogs training courses will guide you and your dog to a deeply forged relationship, that will continue to grow for years to come.

New Dock Diving Class

Fury Retrieving

Malinois Fury taking a jump retrieving his water toy at Western Carolina Diving Dogs.

Dock Diving is the fastest growing dog sport in the US- you and your retrieving buddy can get involved by taking the Beginner Dock Diving course!

The class is for strong swimmers who are also motivated at retrieve work. As your dog progresses from ramp jumping and water retrieving confidently we will encourage them to take their first exciting jumps off the dock.

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7 month old Black Lab Della taking her first jumps at Western Carolina Diving Dogs.

During class we will discuss the different competitive games that are offered as part of dock diving competitions. We will also cover strategies for competitive success for you and your dog.

The Beginner Dock Diving class is offered Saturday mornings at Western Carolina Diving Dogs until the pool closes October 1.

Della’s Day at the Dock

Dock Diving with Della from Kabler School For Dogs on Vimeo.

Tri-Cities, TN Kabler School For Dogs trainer Jeremy Bell and his Black Lab Della are having a blast this Summer learning how to dock dive at Western Carolina Diving Dogs. So far she has been out at the dock 3 times and is loving every minute of it. She has so much fun she hates for her dock time to be over. Each time she jumps her confidence grows and her jumps increase in distance.

At Kabler School For Dogs we love seeing dogs express their natural drive through activities like retrieve work. Satisfying your dogs natural drive through fun activities is a part of every Kabler School For Dogs training course.

Please call us to find out more about the Kabler training philosophy and schedule your dog’s free consultation at (828) 337-5792.

David Featured on WLOS News 13!

News reporter Adriana Mendez and Kabler School For Dogs founder David Kabler.

News Channel 13 reporter Adriana Mendez interviewed David concerning North Carolina’s proposed driving while animal on lap law. Safe riding in the car with our dogs is so important! The proposal would outlaw drivers who ride with dogs on their laps. Check out David on News 13 by following this link:

David on WLOS News

Teaching Gunner to wait and ride in the cargo area of his guardians vehicle.