Holiday Safety Tips

Residency guests Cody and Trek practice go place in the Kabler School For Dogs Pro-Shop!

Christmas Season is upon us! We want to share a few helpful tips to get you and your dog safely through this holiday season! The holidays may be a scary time for some pups. Christmas revelry can cause anxiety and fearfulness for dogs who haven’t experienced it. The following tips may help you avoid an emergency visit to the vet office over the holiday season.

If you have a dog that is fearful of people or small children and you plan on having a big gathering it may be best not to force your puppy or dog into a situation that makes them uncomfortable. Instead, before your guests arrive exercise your dog and make them comfy in their crate with a yummy Kong or marrow bone to keep them occupied. Turn on some sounds like music or a TV to drown out all the noise. If you have a dog that loves being around groups of people and small children, still be mindful to keep your eye on them to assure they do not get into something harmful. Maybe consider having them come out and visit with everyone then go have some crate time with their Kong.

Some holiday plants are Actually poisonous and can cause a medical issue here are some of the most common:

• Christmas tree pine needles can produce oral irritation, vomiting, diarrhea, lethargy, trembling and posterior weakness.

Holly, commonly found during the Christmas season, can cause intense vomiting, diarrhea.

Mistletoe, another Christmas plant, can cause significant vomiting and diarrhea, difficulty breathing, collapse, erratic behavior, hallucinations and death when ingested.

Poinsettia contrary to popular belief, is not deadly; however, it can cause irritation to the mouth and stomach and sometimes vomiting.

With the holiday season come all kinds of yummy treats and food. Be sure to avoid giving your dog food scraps from the table or your plate. If you must share your holiday dinner consider just a small amount given in the dogs bowl to avoid any unwanted behavior or upset tummies.

Here are a few foods and treats to avoid:

Fat trimmings and bones are dangerous for pets. Fat trimmed from meat, both cooked and uncooked, may cause pancreatitis. And, although it seems natural to give a dog a bone, cooked bone are dangerous, these can also splinter and cause an obstruction or lacerations of your dog’s digestive system.

Chocolate can be dangerous and contains various levels of fat, caffeine, the darker and richer the chocolate (baker’s chocolate), the higher the risk of toxicity. Depending on the type and amount of chocolate ingested, dogs might experience vomiting, diarrhea, hyperactivity

• Many cookies and candies have certain nuts and should not be given to pets. Almonds, non-moldy walnuts and pistachios can cause an upset stomach or an obstruction of your dog’s throat and/or intestinal tract. Macadamia nuts and moldy walnuts can be toxic, causing seizures or neurological signs. Lethargy, vomiting and loss of muscle control are among the effects of nut ingestion.

Holiday tinsel and ornaments can also be hazardous:

Tinsel, while not toxic, is very attractive to pets, particularly cats but dogs love it too. The shiny, dangling decoration reflects light and can move in the slightest draft — appearing to come alive to watchful critters. The problem with tinsel is that once it’s consumed, it can cause serious injury to your pet. If not caught in time, this foreign body ingestion could actually be fatal as it twists and bunches inside your pet’s intestines. Immediate veterinary care is required.

Vet offices see a increase in emergency visits during the holiday due to dogs getting into trouble from ingesting items that are harmful or toxic causing it be a not so festive time. Be sure not to risk your dogs health by waiting. If your dog needs emergency care take them quickly to your local emergency clinic.

MedVet: 667 Brevard Road, Asheville NC 28806 • Phone • 828-665-4399

Merry Christmas and a joyous Holiday season to you and yours from all of us here at Kabler School For Dogs!

– Candy Breisacher

Summer Swim Season is Here!

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Fury water retrieving in paradise.

Teaching your dog to swim is super fun and is an excellent way to exercise your four legged companion. When I was 12 I taught my Yellow Lab pup, Duke, to retrieve in the ocean and in my grandparents swimming pool; much to their behest. I even taught him to leap off the diving board. I would pretend he was a swim rescue dog. He enjoyed towing me through the water, pulling me toward the stairs or shore, during my mock rescue scenarios. Duke and I would swim for hours together.

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Fury racing from the swimming hole with his frisbee during a water retrieve.

Today, I still love taking my clients dogs swimming to cool off from the Summer heat. Many athletic dogs will benefit from swimming as it works the dog’s body, mind, and spirit. There is a unique feeling I get, that’s like no other, after going swimming with my dog. As you strive to teach your best friend to become a confident swimmer, it is important to keep some safety tips and training approaches in mind.

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Rose and her guardian playing some fetch at the waterfall.

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Yearling Residency graduate Rose retrieving her tennie.

Practice swim safety by using a long line on the novice swimmer. Always keep a close eye on your dog and don’t allow the long line to become entangled on anything. Beginner and advanced swimmers alike will benefit from wearing a canine life jacket. If your dog swims in a pool or rocky swimming hole, it is critical to repeatedly teach your dog where the stairs or safe exit from the water is.

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Huck’s guardian playing a game of retrieve during an off lead swim session.

Always be ready to jump in the water yourself to assist your best friend if necessary. Avoid forcing your dog into the water. Rely on a slower approach, and grow your dogs confidence around the water. Just like people, dogs learn through experience. So be sure to keep your dog safe and enjoy every minute, allowing each trip to the water to build upon the last.

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Ollie learning to charge it while retrieving his toy during a Yearling swim session.

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Teaching Ollie to love the water during his Yearling training course.

Teaching your dog to swim is always easiest as a pup, and during the yearling phase, but with practice almost all dogs can learn to swim. Begin with small shallow stream crossings and slowly progress to water that is chest deep for your dog. If your dog loves to retrieve, this energy can be of great help to encourage your dog to love the water. I prefer short and fun excursions to swimming spots at first so that it keeps your dog craving more.

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Off Lead Residency guest Cato taking a late season sunset swim.

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Gus’s Guardians using his favorite toy to encourage him into deeper water during a Yearling course swim session.

I teach a swimming class during Spring, Summer, and Fall months for clients who are enrolled in my training courses. There is nothing I love more than watching a dog who confidently loves the water. -David

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Elder dog Daisy helps to socialize young Fury to the water.

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As Fury’s water confidence grows the distance of his retrieves also become greater.

Bike Rides Are a Canine Adventure!

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David out cruising on the bike with his Husky mix Daisy.

At Kabler School For Dogs I love teaching clients with athletic dogs to safely bike together during private training courses. It is quite a thrill to look down at your best friend running in stride next to you while cruising on a path. So many dogs benefit from this additional exercise and some dogs really love to pull and you barely have to pedal! It is so fun and rewarding to share experiences like these with your four legged bestie. In this video you can see how my Husky mix Daisy loves to ride with me– every ride with her is special!

To find out more information please call and say hi about my unique dog training courses. -David


<p><a href=”https://vimeo.com/168225400″>Daisy Out On A Ride</a> from <a href=”https://vimeo.com/user52611151″>Kabler School For Dogs</a> on <a href=”https://vimeo.com”>Vimeo</a&gt;.</p>

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Riding with Summer during an introductory bike session.

Training is About Creating Aligned Energy

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Dobie Lucy joyfully playing a game of retrieve during an obedience session with David on the Kabler training field.

Creating cooperative energy is a top priority during my training classes for pups, yearlings, and adult dogs. When you and your dog have shared goals- this is what I call slipping into alignment with your best friend. Aligned energy expresses itself in many ways.

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Lucy and her guardian practice an aligned walk with a loose lead.

Through obedience it can be seen when your dog is walking politely and happily on a loose leash, pacing themselves to their human guardian with a skip in their step; or during a long stay when the dog is focused on their human while enthusiastically following through with their request. During play, aligned energy is evident during games of retrieve and tug. When you and your dog are flowing together, in tune, with clear communication, then you know that aligned energy is present. During my training classes these moments are created exercise by exercise, cultivated and grown, into a shared way of life between you and your four legged companion. During a Kabler School For Dogs training course this aligned energy becomes ever present in the relationship between you and your dog.

-David

Call (828) 337-5792 to schedule a FREE consultation.

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Lilly practicing a motivational recall request– look at that guardian focus!