Solving Canine Crisis Behaviors

Off Leash Skills

Practicing off leash heeling skills in the neighborhood. Guiding your dog from problem walker to polite companion is our specialty.

Sometimes life doesn’t go as planned and our clients wind up with a dog who is out of alignment with their family’s goals. “I want to walk down the sidewalk happily with my dog, but my dog lunges at every dog they see, and eventually we stopped going on walks.” We hear stories like this daily. Fortunately, our training courses provide effective solutions for your best friends issues.

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Neighborhood loose leash walking skills are a primary goal of our On Leash Obedience Course.

A dog who expresses leash reactive energy may be suffering from pack survival stress and is in desperate need of proper guidance from their human. A dog who is in a constant state of crisis is not a happy dog. Bringing your dog’s behavior around in a way that is easy and fun is one of our training specialties. Creating aligned energy between you and your dog is the goal of every Kabler training program.

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Using customized training techniques, all dogs are able to learn how to walk politely at their owners side while out on walks.

The Kabler School For Dogs training team is committed to helping dog owners solve behavioral issues. Every dog is different and it’s important to choose a trainer with a large toolbox of training skills. All training courses are customized to fit the goals we set for you and your dog during a free consultation. Our approach is intuitive and based on years of experience taking dogs from puppy to advanced off leash reliability.

Please call to discuss your dogs training needs and to schedule your dog’s FREE consultation.

(828) 337-5792

Rock Solid Training

Heeling with German Shepherd Gunnar

Out on a loose lead neighborhood walk with German Shepherd Gunnar.

Creating rock solid obedience that you can safely rely on is what we do best here at Kabler School For Dogs. Once your dog begins their On and Off Lead training courses there is a path that we take from novice to expertly trained dog. The journey to training a dog to rock solid reliability is about teamwork, fun practice sessions, and carefully following the Kabler School For Dogs training roadmap.

Rock solid training begins by building a bombproof foundation. Foundation work teaches your dog how to respond to obedience requests with motivated energy. In the beginning, we want your dog to understand that following through with obedience brings reward. Short and fun training routines are the name of the game when building your foundation. Ending your dogs practice sessions while your dog is at their peak will make your dog always excited to train. Another strategy during the foundation phase is to switch back and forth between training and play.

Off leash heeling becomes a reality.

Punkin and Ayla out on an off leash training walk. Off leash training successfully finishes your dog’s training.

If your dog has behavioral issues like leash reactivity or fearful anxiety we recommend that counter-conditioning be started alongside the foundation phase of training. By using these powerful techniques consistently you can make noticeable changes in your dogs behavior. Counter-conditioning adjusts your dogs energy allowing the coming training phases to take root faster and with more success. The goal of counter-conditioning is to soften behaviors so that the training program can progress with less stress.

The next step on you and your dog’s  journey to rock solid obedience is the guidance phase of training. There are many ways of communicating with your dog including voice requests, hand signals, and body language. During this phase we emphasize communication using the leash. It’s important that your dog understand that a pull on the leash actually means something. Just like a horseback rider communicates with his steed using the reigns we are going to send our dog obedience requests using the leash. Once your dog understands and responds successfully to leash guidance we are ready to continue our training journey to the reliability stage.

Maggie being rewarded.

German Shepherd Maggie being rewarded for a long down stay request during a park training session.

When your dog clearly understands how to respond to the different leash requests it is time to build their ability to reliably listen to your direction. Following through with commands on one request, longer sit and down stays, and consistent loose lead walking are some of the highlights of this training stage. It’s important to train in low to moderate level distraction environments as we strive to achieve the goals of the reliability phase. Once our dog is performing with accuracy it’s time to progress into the finishing phase.

During the finishing phase of training our goals are to make sure the training will work for us anywhere. Some trainers call this the distraction proofing phase. Now that your dog is demonstrating their new training skills with ease it is time to put the training to the test in increasingly higher distraction settings. As your dog learns to respond successfully in higher distraction settings you will notice a settling in your dog that actually deepens the canine/human bond. Seeing that your dog will enthusiastically respond to their training requests regardless of the environment or situation you will know you have achieved rock solid performance with your newly trained best friend.

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Ayla and Punkin practice their long down stay at the park during their Residency training course.

Please call (828) 337-5792 for more information about the unique approach to training at Kabler School For Dogs. Locations in Asheville and Tricities, TN.

What Makes Kabler Training Stand Out From the Pack?

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Blue Heeler Boomer and his guardian practice puppy obedience exercises in class.

This is such a great question that I get asked often. I am thrilled to share all that I’ve learned about dogs and their training with my human and canine clients alike. Training at Kabler School For Dogs is comprehensive and makes raising and training your best friend rewarding and so fun! Here are a few reasons that my training stands out:

• Over 20 Years of Training Experience. I founded Kabler School For Dogs in 1995 and have been fully immersed in the experience of training dogs ever since. I specialize in creating harmonious relationships between dogs and their guardians. I raise pups into superbly trained adults with maximum personality by taking my time with each individual dog and family I work with. Many of my clients find their way to me after having tried other training schools to no avail. I’m well known and referred by veterinarians for being able to train even the most difficult behavioral cases successfully. I get excited about my clients training courses and it shows!

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Goldendoodle Zeppi practicing some fun games after obedience on the Kabler training field.

• An All Life Stages Approach. At Kabler School For Dogs I specialize in raising puppies into well trained adult dogs. It is incredibly important to understand that raising a dog properly takes 1.5-2 years from pup to a fully trained adult. Choosing a trainer that will guide you and your dog through each stage of this journey makes all the difference. Your dogs puppy stage lasts until 5-6 months and my teaching focus during this time is on socialization, games, basic obedience, and house training. The yearling stage is from 6-12 months and I emphasize training activities that deepen the bond between you and your dog. This is the time when we build your dogs ability to retrieve and play interactive games. I enjoy teaching swim classes during this stage to ensure a lifelong love of water.  We gently guide your yearlings house manners in a positive direction daily. While it is important to teach yearlings the foundations of obedience, it is critical not to push the yearling too hard in training. Methods that impatiently train a 6 month old the same as an adult are asking too much. These rushed courses create an inhibited personality that permanently dim your dogs love of life. I like to wait to begin adult stage dog training when your dog is full-grown at 12 months. The focus is on taking the obedience training to an advanced level of accomplishment. Kabler trained dogs happily work with precision out in real world environments like busy parks and outdoor cafe’s.

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Yellow Lab Arlo and his family out practicing his walk during an off leash training session.

• Progressive Training Method. My approach is flexible and changes based upon the needs of each dog I work with. I specialize in customizing the training methods I use so that each dog excels in their training. Many of my clients have tried and failed with other training methods that use a one size fits all approach. All dogs are unique, with different temperaments, personalities, and breeds. Dogs are living breathing members of our family and training should be fun, flexible, and move at your dog’s natural pace.

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Collie/Pyrenees rescue Kona getting started with her obedience in the Kabler training studio.

• Hands On One-on-One Learning Environment. At Kabler School For Dogs you and your best friend learn by performing experiential training exercises that build teamwork. Coming to my studio for lessons gets your dog used to going places and provides a learning environment that allows your dog to excel. As your dog progresses and gains skill we will begin taking training walks around my active neighborhood; we then begin to explore busy parks and city streets. I believe in starting training in a low distraction environment and progressing to higher and higher levels of distraction at your dogs natural pace. My training courses emphasize hands on experience and at the end of each one of my training sessions I give written homework so you know exactly what to be working on each week at home.

• Extra Lessons Guarantee. My extra lessons guarantee is attached to all of my qualified adult training programs. At Kabler School For Dogs my clients are purchasing the results of the training, not a set number of sessions. All of my courses are backed up by my time and commitment to your dogs training.

All of my courses begin with a free consultation so I can assess your dog’s temperament, behavioral concerns and training needs. Please call me and find out more about my unique approach to training family canine companions. -David

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German Shepherd Leo playing a game of retrieve during an off leash session.

Summer Swim Season is Here!

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Fury water retrieving in paradise.

Teaching your dog to swim is super fun and is an excellent way to exercise your four legged companion. When I was 12 I taught my Yellow Lab pup, Duke, to retrieve in the ocean and in my grandparents swimming pool; much to their behest. I even taught him to leap off the diving board. I would pretend he was a swim rescue dog. He enjoyed towing me through the water, pulling me toward the stairs or shore, during my mock rescue scenarios. Duke and I would swim for hours together.

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Fury racing from the swimming hole with his frisbee during a water retrieve.

Today, I still love taking my clients dogs swimming to cool off from the Summer heat. Many athletic dogs will benefit from swimming as it works the dog’s body, mind, and spirit. There is a unique feeling I get, that’s like no other, after going swimming with my dog. As you strive to teach your best friend to become a confident swimmer, it is important to keep some safety tips and training approaches in mind.

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Rose and her guardian playing some fetch at the waterfall.

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Yearling Residency graduate Rose retrieving her tennie.

Practice swim safety by using a long line on the novice swimmer. Always keep a close eye on your dog and don’t allow the long line to become entangled on anything. Beginner and advanced swimmers alike will benefit from wearing a canine life jacket. If your dog swims in a pool or rocky swimming hole, it is critical to repeatedly teach your dog where the stairs or safe exit from the water is.

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Huck’s guardian playing a game of retrieve during an off lead swim session.

Always be ready to jump in the water yourself to assist your best friend if necessary. Avoid forcing your dog into the water. Rely on a slower approach, and grow your dogs confidence around the water. Just like people, dogs learn through experience. So be sure to keep your dog safe and enjoy every minute, allowing each trip to the water to build upon the last.

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Ollie learning to charge it while retrieving his toy during a Yearling swim session.

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Teaching Ollie to love the water during his Yearling training course.

Teaching your dog to swim is always easiest as a pup, and during the yearling phase, but with practice almost all dogs can learn to swim. Begin with small shallow stream crossings and slowly progress to water that is chest deep for your dog. If your dog loves to retrieve, this energy can be of great help to encourage your dog to love the water. I prefer short and fun excursions to swimming spots at first so that it keeps your dog craving more.

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Off Lead Residency guest Cato taking a late season sunset swim.

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Gus’s Guardians using his favorite toy to encourage him into deeper water during a Yearling course swim session.

I teach a swimming class during Spring, Summer, and Fall months for clients who are enrolled in my training courses. There is nothing I love more than watching a dog who confidently loves the water. -David

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Elder dog Daisy helps to socialize young Fury to the water.

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As Fury’s water confidence grows the distance of his retrieves also become greater.

Bike Rides Are a Canine Adventure!

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David out cruising on the bike with his Husky mix Daisy.

At Kabler School For Dogs I love teaching clients with athletic dogs to safely bike together during private training courses. It is quite a thrill to look down at your best friend running in stride next to you while cruising on a path. So many dogs benefit from this additional exercise and some dogs really love to pull and you barely have to pedal! It is so fun and rewarding to share experiences like these with your four legged bestie. In this video you can see how my Husky mix Daisy loves to ride with me– every ride with her is special!

To find out more information please call and say hi about my unique dog training courses. -David


<p><a href=”https://vimeo.com/168225400″>Daisy Out On A Ride</a> from <a href=”https://vimeo.com/user52611151″>Kabler School For Dogs</a> on <a href=”https://vimeo.com”>Vimeo</a&gt;.</p>

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Riding with Summer during an introductory bike session.

Training is About Creating Aligned Energy

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Dobie Lucy joyfully playing a game of retrieve during an obedience session with David on the Kabler training field.

Creating cooperative energy is a top priority during my training classes for pups, yearlings, and adult dogs. When you and your dog have shared goals- this is what I call slipping into alignment with your best friend. Aligned energy expresses itself in many ways.

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Lucy and her guardian practice an aligned walk with a loose lead.

Through obedience it can be seen when your dog is walking politely and happily on a loose leash, pacing themselves to their human guardian with a skip in their step; or during a long stay when the dog is focused on their human while enthusiastically following through with their request. During play, aligned energy is evident during games of retrieve and tug. When you and your dog are flowing together, in tune, with clear communication, then you know that aligned energy is present. During my training classes these moments are created exercise by exercise, cultivated and grown, into a shared way of life between you and your four legged companion. During a Kabler School For Dogs training course this aligned energy becomes ever present in the relationship between you and your dog.

-David

Call (828) 337-5792 to schedule a FREE consultation.

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Lilly practicing a motivational recall request– look at that guardian focus!

Kabler Training is Healing for Daisy

Daisy practicing a down stay request.

Miniature Schnauzer Daisy practicing a down stay request.

When I first met Miniature Schnauzer Daisy she was a frightened and severely anxious dog. She would bark at common noises in the home with intense excitability to the point of nipping. Her leash reactivity towards other dogs manifested in protective energy that could easily slip into aggression. Her veterinarian had prescribed anti-anxiety meds, with limited success. When I evaluated Daisy, I knew I could help her. She had incredible food drive, was super smart, with a quick wit, that gave her enthusiastic training energy. I enrolled this precious girl and her guardians in my confidence building course. We began working on changing her ideas about the world, and establishing solid obedience, mixed with fun games. By the end of our course, Daisy was a transformed dog– her anxious energy had been successfully channeled into her obedience and she had moved into alignment with her human guardians. After her training program was completed Daisy’s guardians worked with their veterinarian to wean her off her anxiety medication– she is now drug free! It’s been a rewarding training journey making such a dramatic change in Daisy.

-David

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Daisy can now accept the presence of other dogs without aggression.

Today we finished our classes with Mr. Kabler. I can’t begin to tell you how our family life has changed. Our Daisy is a wonderful 5 year old Miniature Schnauzer. Most people didn’t see her that way. They shied away from her and felt she was harmful. She barked as if she would attack although she has never been aggressive. I admit I was a little wary of her around my grandchildren.

Mr. Kabler met with us and evaluated Daisy. He told us she wasn’t vicious, she was just excitable. This made us feel so much better. Daisy acted out in fear not aggression. He felt confident that he could help us and alleviate some of Daisy’s anxiety. Before working with Mr. Kabler, Daisy could not be around other dogs or people. Reasons were as discussed above. I could tell when we were on a walk that she wanted to play with another dog. It was so sad.  She would go up to a dog but then lose it and began to bark harshly. This in turn scared the other dog away. Daisy was very lonely. Another problem we had with Daisy was doorbells and the ringing of the telephone. She would bark, run in circles and nip at the person trying to answer it. It really was a hard time in our home. Daisy was put on anxiety meds twice a day to help calm her down, but we saw she was getting worse as time went on.

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Miniature Schnauzer Daisy practicing a down stay request.

We decided to listen to Mr. Kabler and signed up for classes. This was the best decision we have ever made.

Today Daisy is a very happy dog. Her anxiety level has drastically lessened. In time, perhaps meds can be reduced. She can now walk with us in the neighborhood and allow people to pet her. She also goes up to other dogs and sniffs them a few seconds and walks away without barking. We can also get to the phone without fear and actually get it before the caller hangs up!

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Daisy and Zoey can be a happy family after Kabler training.

I never would have believed others see Daisy as we do, a loving sweet and VERY smart dog!!

Because She has done so well with other dogs these days, we have a new addition to our family. A little Morkie called Zoey. Daisy helps us to train her. They have become best friends. This would not have been possible before Mr. Kabler worked his magic. Enclosed is a pic of Daisy with Zoey, her best friend. Again thank you Mr. Kabler.

-The Scott Family, Daisy & Zoey

Daisy out practicing her loose leash walk in the neighborhood.

Daisy out practicing her loose leash walk in the neighborhood.

Strong Family Units: Understanding Pack Survival Anxiety in Companion Dogs

Many of todays trainers are eschewing the idea that our modern dogs are pack animals. In spite of their best efforts, the idea that our dogs are pack oriented continues in the mainstream consciousness. Why? Possibly, it is because dogs often display many of the same traits that their wild relatives do. It’s easy to see the similarities between wild and domestic canines. I would suggest that the idea of pack oriented behavior is often misunderstood and stereotyped. Ruthless aggression, and young dogs rising to the top position through dominant violence, are all outdated ideas of pack behavior that have been disproven by modern science.

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Thor and Vinka are easy to walk after Kabler training.

Perhaps, it would be better for todays trainers to say that the modern understanding of pack behavior has changed, rather than throwing out the pack paradigm altogether. I believe that dogs respond positively to being a part of a strong family unit. In the wild, wolf packs are primarily made up of family members. The mother and father are the Alpha female and male. Their children are their followers whose primary job is to learn how to successfully hunt as a pack. Juvenile’s often play wildly, lacking the focus needed to successfully lead, and it is the pack leaders responsibility to clearly guide them.

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A pack is a strong family that spends time together: The Kabler living room.

The canine family pack is misconstrued as being a cold and violent place where the Alpha pair lead with impunity. The reality is far from this popular misconception. The pack is actually a warm and safe place. The wild canines have extremely close relationships with the Alpha pair and the other pack members who are often their siblings. The strong family provides security, safety, and assures the canines ability to hunt large game. If a wolf in the wild loses their pack, they also lose the security that comes with it and suffer from intense survival stress– the wild dog instinctively knows that their future is no longer certain and their anxiety levels increase. Wild dogs thrive within a family pack, but suffer extreme stress when isolated and alone. Through my training experience, I have witnessed countless pet dogs exhibit this same anxiety when they feel they are isolated or part of a weakly structured family unit. Pack survival anxiety can cause behavioral issues and problems for our modern dogs.

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GSD Huck is so excited to be re-united with his family after his Kabler Residency.

It is vital that we provide our modern pet dogs with the security of a strong family unit. This will create a sense of belonging in the dogs mind that simulates the natural need for a dog to have a pack. The strong family unit provides a blanket of security that decreases anxious behaviors and fosters clear communication. Strong families have routines, group activities, and expectations of each member providing all involved with purpose and love. The Kabler training method is designed to teach human guardians how to create a strong sense of a structured family for their canine companions.

Happy Training!

-David

Call David to find out more about his unique training approach at

828-337-5792 & to schedule your dogs free consultation.

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Gus and his guardian practice a loose leash walk at the park.

Kabler Training Transforms Rescued Dogo Argentino

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Rescued Dogo Alistair successfully worked through intense dog aggression in Kabler training.

When I first met Alistair and the Guthrie’s they were struggling to contain a dog that was highly aggressive towards other dogs and cats. He was a rescue and suffered an abusive puppyhood. After our consultation I knew that I could help this incredible and handsome boy that was loved so much. Over the course of my on leash program I was able to successfully teach him and his guardians using the Kabler approach to training. The complete transformation in Alistair’s behavior was an amazing experience for me. I just love receiving referral letters like this. Happy training! – David

I cannot recommend David Kabler enough.

When we adopted our 5-year-old, male Dogo Argentino, Alistair, he could not be anywhere near other dogs. Any dog within 50 yards would send our otherwise sweet, 100 lb. boy into a lunging, snarling fit.

We did our best on our own for two or three months until he burst through our front door and attacked a dog walking with its owner 30 yards away.

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Practicing a sit request with Dogo Alistair during a private session.

When we called David he assured us that he had experience with large, powerful, hard-headed breeds, and that he was confident he could help us. The best part was that David set very realistic expectations and never promised us anything. In the end the results were far beyond anything we could have ever expected.

Over the course of roughly 10 sessions, spanning three to four months, the transformation in Alistair was incredible. David helped us build a strong foundation of obedience and boundaries while giving us the knowledge and skills we needed to continue Alistair’s training. Instead of every walk being a game of “dodge the dogs” for fear of a chaotic meltdown, Alistair can hang out at the Wedge and play with his many new dog friends.

Regardless of the issues any dog is having, I would confidently recommend and trust David to help anyone through it.

Sincerely,
J. Guthrie & Family

Nobility, Companionship, and Love– Training from the Heart

CALL NOW TO SCHEDULE YOUR FREE CONSULTATION (828) 337-5792

Kabler Crest

The new Kabler School For Dogs crest.

The new Kabler School For Dogs crest exemplifies the Kabler philosophy of teaching and training canines. The imagery within the design communicates the ideals that have always been at the foundation of the Kabler canine training method. The crest radiates a sense of nobility, respect for our dogs, companionship, listening to the heart, obeying the intuitive side of our nature, the attainment of lofty training goals, and the love that each canine companion gives freely to us every day.

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German Shepherd Maggie Kabler retrieving car keys as apart of her Assistance Dog training– Officially the best baby sitter in the world.

When I look at this crest, I am reminded of all the challenges that I have overcome to learn this knowledge and wisdom of training dogs. I am thankful for all of my teachers and their different styles– ultimately training is a tradition passed from one trainer to another. I remember all the hard work, the hundreds of dogs that have taught me so much over the years, and the dedication that it took to find success. In my minds eye I can see the beautiful inner spark of each individual canine that I have trained. I am thankful for all the Guardians I have taught whose families will be forever enhanced by sharing their lives with a well trained dog.

I believe the connection that we share with our dogs is a link with our collective human past. By feeding and nourishing the canine/human relationship we are rewarded with a strong sense of healing love as well as a direct connection to the natural world. It is my goal to foster these gifts by teaching all my clients, human and canine alike, with  a patient and intuitive training approach. In sharing the Kabler training method with my clients I strive to create positive alignments and meaningful relationships between canines and their Guardians. – David

Barry

Belgian Malinois Barry Kabler, PH1,CGC clears a 5 foot fence. A well trained canine companion add so much to our experience.

CALL NOW TO SCHEDULE YOUR FREE CONSULTATION (828) 337-5792

Channeling and Harnessing Your Dog’s Natural Drive

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Lobo expressing his natural drive during a motivational recall request.

Natural Drive is your dogs inclination to exhibit inherent canine behaviors– which we can harness in training. Some of these behaviors include eating food, chasing their Guardian, pulling (sleds, carts, bicycles, etc.), retrieving, and tugging. Natural Drive in canine companion dogs is present in all puppies, in varying amounts, and is either enhanced or diminished by environmental factors during maturation. Puppies who are raised to exhibit some of these natural behaviors into adulthood are happier and have better relationships with their human Guardians.

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Gypsy retrieving her tennis ball for a job well done.

Many dogs have their Natural Drives diminished at an early stage in their life. Their Guardians reduce their dogs ability to play by mistakenly punishing their canine for exhibiting these natural behaviors. It is much healthier for the young dogs mind if we successfully harness this Natural Drive by channelling the energy into enjoyable games that we can play with our best friends.

Dogs that have very strong Natural Drives are able to resist efforts by their Guardians to reduce what humans often perceive as nuisance behaviors. In many cases, these dogs are left anxious and conflicted as they have no acceptable outlet for their Natural Drives. Often, these highly driven canines who lack direction and leadership will begin to demonstrate problem behaviors like lunging, constantly pulling on their lead, jumping, and possible aggression.

When building a relationship with high drive dogs it is helpful to reward the dog by engaging their Natural Drive instincts. This can be accomplished by using treats, tugs, and ball rewards in training. Channeling and harnessing your dogs Natural Drive is an important aspect of training canines and will help deepen the relationship you have with your four legged companion.

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Merlin being rewarded for a successful Stay with an ultra fun game of tug.

While training dogs who have had their Natural Drive inhibited it is important to provide ample opportunities for these dogs to reconnect with their instinctive drives. Almost all dogs can be persuaded to accept treats in training and increase their ability to work for food. Sometimes it is also possible to reignite the inhibited canines natural instincts to retrieve and tug. In both cases it is imperative to remain patient and give the inhibited dog plenty of time to begin to accept treats and play as rewards during training sessions.

Keeping your dogs drive and natural spark alive and engaged is the job of every responsible canine Guardian. Strong instinctive pullers can be taught to ride a bicycle using a Springer device with a pulling harness. Dogs with natural retrieve and tug drive can be rewarded for successful obedience requests with play. All dogs benefit from using treats to enhance their instinctual food drive. Teach your best friend to follow you as you move and perform requests like Sit, Down and Stay for treat rewards. Keep all these training sessions short and fun and over time you will see your dogs abilities improve and your relationship grow.

If you have any questions about your dogs Natural Drive or the Kabler School For Dogs training program please call me at (828) 337-5792. I would enjoy saying hi and hearing more about your best friend. Happy training!

-David

CALL NOW TO SCHEDULE YOUR FREE CONSULTATION (828) 337-5792

Frank

Frank’s Guardian engages him with an action packed game of tug– working with your dogs Natural Drive deepens the canine/human bond.

2012… What a Fabulous Year of Training

CALL NOW TO SCHEDULE YOUR FREE CONSULTATION (828) 337-5792

Daisy having fun on this years trip to Hatteras Island.

Daisy having fun on this years trip to Hatteras Island.

As 2012 comes to a close, I find myself reflecting on all the wonderful clients that my apprentice Kim and I have had the opportunity to work with this past year. It has truly been four fabulous seasons of training canine best friends and their human Guardians. There is nothing we like to do more than to facilitate creating better canine/human relationships.

Mountain Feist, Squash, at 8 weeks.

Adorable Mountain Feist, Squash, at 8 weeks.

This past year started off on a great note with a new puppy, as I assisted in raising and training Squash, a gorgeous Mountain Feist. I absolutely adore Terriers, their incredible energy, and strength of will. I was fascinated as we played tug with this intelligent little guy and thought about my own childhood Terrier, McDuff. It has been so fun watching Squash grow over the past year.

Eli, relaxing during our training session.

Eli, relaxing during our training session.

Over the Summer, I met Eli, an incredible German Shepherd Dog who was suffering from fearful territorial aggression. He was under socialized as a puppy and, at a year and a half, was showing aggression towards anyone not in his immediate family. He spent our entire consultation lunging, snarling, growling and barking at me. I immediately recommended a de-conditioning program to help alleviate the cause of the aggressive behavior and also started his foundational obedience. We were able to successfully rehabilitate this handsome boy, changing his behavior, eliminating his aggressive responses, and complete his Tethered and Untethered obedience training.

Chippie Lee and Barley learning obedience and overcoming sibling aggression together.

Chippie Lee and Barley learning obedience and overcoming sibling aggression together.

Also over the Summer, I enjoyed working with Barley and Chippie Lee, two siblings who were suffering from intense aggressive sibling rivalry. They erupted into a very tenacious fight during our first training session and it was obvious that Barley was over reacting in a big way to any perceived transgression on the part of Chippie Lee. I taught them and their Guardian proper obedience– effectively setting up their Guardian as a strong leader. Today these two are happily living together with no more sibling aggression.

Jack absolutely thrived during his stay at the Kabler house.

Jack absolutely thrived during his stay at the Kabler house.

In the Fall I trained Jack in my Residency Training Course. My Residency dogs are guests in my home where I can really focus on teaching house manners. Each guest goes for walks and is trained daily. I really enjoy taking Residency Guests on field trips. Sunny Point Cafe, Hickory Nut Gap Farms, French Broad River Park, and downtown Asheville have all been destinations. Asheville has a new and amazingly effective training option. This program offers incredible results and is so fun for your dog!

Bernese Mountain Dog Ellie learned so much during her Kabler Residency Training.

Bernese Mountain Dog Ellie learned so much during her Kabler Residency Training.

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Kabler apprentice taking time for snuggles after obedience practice.

In 2012 Kabler apprentice Kim Turley has also been progressing in her training knowledge and ability. I have been so excited to see Kim’s confidence grow as she becomes a skilled trainer and instructor. Watching her learn to train has brought back many memories of my own experiences as a young trainer and my desire to discover the best techniques and methods for teaching canines. I am so proud of Kim and am looking forward to seeing my apprentices continued progression in 2013.

In the Fall, I worked closely with Jenna Yarosh at Patton Avenue Pet Company to establish our unique Puppy Preschool Class. Few things compare with the excitement of raising a puppy and this class is designed to assist new Guardians. I love raising pups and in this class Kim and I teach optimum ways to socialize, house train, obedience train, and play train with your new family addition.

Things I have learned this year training best friends– or what the the dogs have taught me:

1.) There is no rush. While working with German Shepherd Dog Eli’s Untethered training I learned a valuable lesson about moving too fast and the importance of progressing slowly. As we were transitioning him from Tethered to Untethered obedience it became evident that he needed more time and lots of more play added into his training. This is one reason why in 2012 I have extended Kabler’s training guarantee to include lifetime follow up lessons– what I enjoy most is learning what the dogs have to teach me and I can only learn these lessons by taking a dog from start to finish and standing by their side for the long haul.

Bogie playing a vigorous game of tug during his training.

Pitbull Bogie playing a vigorous game of tug during his training.

2.) Always remember to take time for play and praise. I love training dogs so much and sometimes get incredibly focused on teaching and then one of my dogs will look up at me and make a playful gesture and successfully instigate my playful side and remind me how important play is to both humans and dogs. I am reminded of my clients, a Golden Retriever named Obi and a Pitbull named Bogie, whose Guardians are learning to use play as a reward. Play and praise are often overlooked as motivational tools and it is incredibly important to use both of these whenever possible in addition to treats as positive rewards.

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Daisy having fun on this years trip to Hatteras Island.

3.) Continue to work on becoming as good at reading human Guardians as I am at reading the dogs. I am incredibly focused on my dogs during training, so much so, that sometimes I need to remind myself that the human Guardian is just as important to the training process as the dog. It is important to remember that the dog and Guardian are a team. I constantly strive to train my clients holistically from this dual canine/human perspective.

These are just a few of my training cases that I have handled over the past year. All of my clients and their dogs are so important to us here at Kabler School For Dogs. It has truly been an awesome year working with so many dogs. I hope that you will get in touch and discuss you and your best friends training goals for the new year– we are so excited about all the possibilities coming in 2013.  – David

CALL NOW TO SCHEDULE YOUR FREE CONSULTATION (828) 337-5792

Proud Kabler Guardians Train their Canines to the Highest Level.

These advanced Canine companions show off their rock solid Down and Stay Requests at Distraction Proofing class.

These advanced Canine companions show off their rock solid Down and Stay Requests at Distraction Proofing class.

At Kabler School For Dogs we take our ability to train Guardians and their best friends to the highest levels very seriously– and have a fabulous time doing it! The recent invitation only Proofing Class was a huge success and should give Canine Guardians everywhere motivation to practice daily with their best friends.

All the dogs and Guardians had an excellent time training in the advanced Distraction Proofing class at Carrier Park.

All the dogs and Guardians had an excellent time training in the advanced Distraction Proofing class at Carrier Park.

This Distraction Proofing Class was held in Asheville at Carrier Park around the bowling green. Class began with an on leash meet and greet. The Guardians and dogs got to say hello while tethered and work on leash manners. Next, we worked  on Untethered off leash training by taking an off lead group walk with all the dogs. We also worked on our long Down and Stay requests with residency dog Ellie providing the distractions by walking around the dogs. We wrapped up the session with 100 yard motivational recalls and some play time. It was incredible to see all the dogs run at full speed towards their Guardians.

These advanced Canine companions show off their rock solid Down and Stay Requests at Distraction Proofing class.

Kabler Apprentice Trainer Kim walking Bernese Mountain Dog Ellie around all the dogs for Distraction Proofing.

All the Canine and Human Guardians had an awesome time participating in this intensely fun class. The challenging nature of this class and the ease with which the dogs completed all the exercises is proof positive in the strength of the Kabler training technique which is adaptable to fit the requirements of dogs with varying temperaments. Training is a journey that Guardians take with their canine companions. Having fun while training is as important as achieving results. It was an incredible class– be on the lookout for future proofing classes in exciting new locations in 2013.

It’s Been a Busy Fall Training Season

Handsome German Shepherd Dog Eli practicing a Down & Stay request during an in home training session.

Gorgeous Doolin accepting a reward from her Guardian for a successful Down & Stay request.

At Kabler School For Dogs we have been having an awesome Fall training season. My apprentice Kim and I have been successfully finishing up with our Summer training cases. Tenshi and Jack both graduated through the Residency Training Course. Eli, a very aggressive German Shepherd, has been successfully de-conditioned in his response to strangers and his untethered obedience is coming along nicely. Kim’s training dog Iko and his Guardian are getting close to Tethered graduation. We are really excited about all of our graduates– and beginning training with lots of new Guardians and their canine companions. Kim and I would like to welcome all of our new clients to Kabler School For Dogs.

Obi is a gregarious Golden– The highest goal of obedience is to shape and grow the relationship between Guardian and Canine companion.

Kabler School For Dogs is proud to announce our Puppy Preschool Class. The training of the young pup is often overlooked by novice dog Guardians. These early weeks are actually critical to the healthy development of your best friend. Proper training and socialization from 8-20 weeks can successfully prevent serious behavioral issues later. Puppy Preschool also includes house training, crate training, redirecting play biting, reward based obedience, and fun games you can play with your new dog. New puppies are welcome each week– hope to see you and your new pup at class. To enroll call Kabler School For Dogs at (828) 337-5792.

Working Dogs Get A Job… And Love It.

Toby and Blaze

Toby, Blaze and their Guardian Fred learning to work together.

When I went out for an in home consultation I met Fred and his two handsome dogs Toby and Blaze. Both dogs were incredibly high energy. Fred was suffering from back trouble and could not walk his boys without them pulling and lunging uncontrollably. The dogs leapt all over me, scratching me with their strong paws and it was clear that Fred needed more control over them than he had. We started with basic training and advanced until Fred was able to walk both of them politely down his street. Both dogs learned to listen to Fred for direction, walk slowly with him on loose leashes, and to sit or down stay upon request. Now, after going through my Basic training course, Fred has a stronger relationship with his two dogs, and has a higher level of control at home and when taking them places. Toby and Blaze, both working breeds, have their need for a job satisfied— It is incredibly rewarding for me when I see a new bond of trust, respect and communication grow between dogs and their humans. Following is a letter from Fred describing his experience training at Kabler School For Dogs. Happy training!      -David

I was referred to David Kabler at Kabler School For Dogs by Aaron Bales (Owner/Manager) of Happy Tails Country Club in Fairview. I was looking for training sources for my 2 dogs, Toby, a 9 month old Labrador mix adopted from Brother Wolf, and Blaze, a 5 year old Shepherd mix from Asheville Humane. Blaze had been to obedience classes for 18 sessions during the 5 years before meeting David.

I called David and he came out to our house to meet Blaze and Toby. I had called David primarily to work with Toby (the puppy). We made arrangements for David to work with Toby for 5 sessions at our house beginning the following week. As it turned out David told me to include Blaze as well, which I thought was great for them to get some training together. We began the following week with basic beginnings.

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Toby and Blaze are handsome boys– practicing Down and Stay upon request.

What I have truly learned the most, is how to change my actions with dogs and how to positively guide them in situations, versus scolding them for unwanted behavior. I have seen vast improvement in both dogs and I have learned how to actively work with each dog on their strong points and their weaknesses.

Kabler Dog Training is not just dog training, but people training as well. I had to learn how to teach and communicate with both dogs even though Blaze was further along than Toby. After about the 3rd class we would go out to wait for David’s arrival and both dogs were very excited to see David even though he was a very firm instructor. They enjoyed their time with Kabler School For Dogs, as did I. I highly recommend his classes.

Thank you David.

Gerry and Fred S.

“Toby & Blaze”